1. Helen Thorpe’s latest continues to garner great praise, named “Book of the Week” in this week’s People Magazine.What’s it like to be a woman in the military? Over 12 years, Thorpe follows grandmother Debbie Helton, single mom Desma Brooks and college student Michelle Fischer, three unlikely friends in the Indiana National Guard. They struggle with the male-dominated culture around them and survive deployments to Afghanistan and Iraq, returning to a world that seems trivial in comparison. A raw, intimate look at the impact of combat and the healing power of friendship.

    Helen Thorpe’s latest continues to garner great praise, named “Book of the Week” in this week’s People Magazine.

    What’s it like to be a woman in the military? Over 12 years, Thorpe follows grandmother Debbie Helton, single mom Desma Brooks and college student Michelle Fischer, three unlikely friends in the Indiana National Guard. They struggle with the male-dominated culture around them and survive deployments to Afghanistan and Iraq, returning to a world that seems trivial in comparison. A raw, intimate look at the impact of combat and the healing power of friendship.
     
  2. Bo Burlingham’s next book, Finish Big, comes out in Novmember."Bo Burlingham’s book Small Giants became an instant classic for its original take on a common business problem—how to handle the pressure to grow. It used deeply researched entrepreneurship stories to provide fresh insight into what really makes a great small business. Now Burlingham returns with a look at an even more common problem—how to leave your company gracefully. He interviewed dozens of owners who have sold or bequeathed their companies and distilled nine key lessons for success.”

    Bo Burlingham’s next book, Finish Big, comes out in Novmember.

    "Bo Burlingham’s book Small Giants became an instant classic for its original take on a common business problem—how to handle the pressure to grow. It used deeply researched entrepreneurship stories to provide fresh insight into what really makes a great small business. Now Burlingham returns with a look at an even more common problem—how to leave your company gracefully. He interviewed dozens of owners who have sold or bequeathed their companies and distilled nine key lessons for success.”
     
  3. Sandeep’s new book is available now.In Sandeep Jauhar’s arresting memoir about the realities of practicing medicine in America, “Doctored: The Disillusionment of an American Physician,” he describes an interaction he has with a patient at Long Island Jewish Medical Center, where he is the director of the heart failure program. The patient has an abdominal mass and has been transferred to the medical center from another hospital for a preoperative evaluation. Dr. Jauhar tells her that there are some things he needs to figure out before sending her to the operating room.

“Like what is this mass,” he says. “Is it cancer? Has it spread?” Neither her paperwork nor the doctor from the other hospital had provided answers.

“Do you know if it has?” she asks, wondering if the cancer has metastasized. He does not. “No one knows what is going on,” she says, her eyes filling with tears. [NYTimes.com]

    Sandeep’s new book is available now.

    In Sandeep Jauhar’s arresting memoir about the realities of practicing medicine in America, “Doctored: The Disillusionment of an American Physician,” he describes an interaction he has with a patient at Long Island Jewish Medical Center, where he is the director of the heart failure program. The patient has an abdominal mass and has been transferred to the medical center from another hospital for a preoperative evaluation. Dr. Jauhar tells her that there are some things he needs to figure out before sending her to the operating room. “Like what is this mass,” he says. “Is it cancer? Has it spread?” Neither her paperwork nor the doctor from the other hospital had provided answers. “Do you know if it has?” she asks, wondering if the cancer has metastasized. He does not. “No one knows what is going on,” she says, her eyes filling with tears. [NYTimes.com]
     
  4. Peter McGraw, along with The Humor Code co-author Joel Warner, were recently guests on Marc Maron’s WTF podcast. Listen above.

     
  5. American medicine is the best in the world when it comes to providing high-tech care. If you have an esoteric disease, you want to be in the United States. God forbid you have Ebola, our academic medical centers are second to none. But if you have run-of-the-mill chronic diseases like congestive heart failure or diabetes, the system is not designed to find you the best possible care. And that’s what has to change.
    — Listen to Sandeep Jauhar on NPR’s Fresh Air
     
  6. Helen Thorpe explains what it’s like to be a woman in the military, from her new book Soldier Girls. Watch here.

    Helen Thorpe explains what it’s like to be a woman in the military, from her new book Soldier Girls. Watch here.

     
  7. Sam Harris was recently interviewed about his new book.Sam Harris is the author of several bestselling books and winner of the 2005 PEN Award for Nonfiction. He is a cofounder and the CEO of Project Reason, a nonprofit foundation devoted to spreading scientific knowledge and secular values in society. He received a degree in philosophy from Stanford University and a PhD in neuroscience from UCLA. But don’t let all those credentials scare you; he’s also an awesome guy.

Waking Up: A Guide to Spirituality Without Religion, Sam’s newest book, is part seeker’s memoir, part exploration of the scientific underpinnings of spirituality. No other book marries contemplative wisdom and modern science in this way, and no author other than Sam Harris—a scientist, philosopher, and famous skeptic—could write it.

Sam was kind enough to discuss Waking Up and mindfulness with me for our readers. Before you continue, please take a moment to thank Sam on Twitter for taking the time to share his insight at The Minimalists.

    Sam Harris was recently interviewed about his new book.

    Sam Harris is the author of several bestselling books and winner of the 2005 PEN Award for Nonfiction. He is a cofounder and the CEO of Project Reason, a nonprofit foundation devoted to spreading scientific knowledge and secular values in society. He received a degree in philosophy from Stanford University and a PhD in neuroscience from UCLA. But don’t let all those credentials scare you; he’s also an awesome guy. Waking Up: A Guide to Spirituality Without Religion, Sam’s newest book, is part seeker’s memoir, part exploration of the scientific underpinnings of spirituality. No other book marries contemplative wisdom and modern science in this way, and no author other than Sam Harris—a scientist, philosopher, and famous skeptic—could write it. Sam was kind enough to discuss Waking Up and mindfulness with me for our readers. Before you continue, please take a moment to thank Sam on Twitter for taking the time to share his insight at The Minimalists.
     
  8. Annie Murphy Paul has collected all of her posts for the New York Times’ Motherlode parenting blog in her monthly newsletter. Browse the archive of posts here.

    Annie Murphy Paul has collected all of her posts for the New York Times’ Motherlode parenting blog in her monthly newsletter. Browse the archive of posts here.

     
  9. Listen to Sandeep Jauhar on Marketplace discussing his new book, Doctored.

     
  10. Excellent Marc Gunther feature at Ensia Media: “Zero Waste World.”Don’t let fashion go to waste,” says H&M, the global clothing retailer that booked $20 billion in revenues last year. So I brought a bag of old T-shirts, sweaters and khaki pants to an H&M store in Washington, D.C., where it took them, no questions asked, and gave me a coupon for 15 percent off my next purchase. H&M takes back clothes in all of its 3,100 stores in 53 countries. [Ensia.com]

    Excellent Marc Gunther feature at Ensia Media: “Zero Waste World.”

    Don’t let fashion go to waste,” says H&M, the global clothing retailer that booked $20 billion in revenues last year. So I brought a bag of old T-shirts, sweaters and khaki pants to an H&M store in Washington, D.C., where it took them, no questions asked, and gave me a coupon for 15 percent off my next purchase. H&M takes back clothes in all of its 3,100 stores in 53 countries. [Ensia.com]
     
  11. Helen Thorpe was on to discuss her new book Soldier Girls. Watch here.

    Helen Thorpe was on to discuss her new book Soldier Girls. Watch here.

     
  12. 10:14

    Notes: 3

    Reblogged from kindlequotes

    Tags: chip heathdan heathreblog

    In proverbs, abstract truths are often encoded in concrete language: “A bird in hand is worth two in the bush.” Speaking concretely is the only way to ensure that our idea will mean the same thing to everyone in our audience.
     
  13. Stephanie Donaldson-Pressman and Rebecca Jackson at Psychology Today

    Authors of the new book The Learning Habit, Stephanie Donaldson-Pressman and Rebecca Jackson, have collaborated on a new piece: “How Not to Raise a Generation of Quitters.”

    In the United States, at least 36% of school-aged children will not attempt a difficult or strenuous task. Furthermore, parents report that these children will quit tasks that are challenging “most or all of the time.” In countries with more rigorous standards than those currently imposed by the United States, parents’ report that children are far less likely to quit. [PsychologyToday.com]
     
  14. 09:42

    Notes: 1

    Helen Thorpe’s latest book, Soldier Girls, having already been tagged as one of the best books of the year by the Washington Post, has been named an Editor’s Choice selection in the Sunday New York Times book section. When they signed up for the Indiana National Guard, the three women at the center of Helen Thorpe’s compelling new book, “Soldier Girls,” never imagined they would end up in a combat zone in Afghanistan or Iraq. [NYTimes.com]

    Helen Thorpe’s latest book, Soldier Girls, having already been tagged as one of the best books of the year by the Washington Post, has been named an Editor’s Choice selection in the Sunday New York Times book section.

    When they signed up for the Indiana National Guard, the three women at the center of Helen Thorpe’s compelling new book, “Soldier Girls,” never imagined they would end up in a combat zone in Afghanistan or Iraq. [NYTimes.com]
     
  15. Another review of Beth Macy’s best seller, Factory Man, at the New York Times.It is impossible to read Beth Macy’s “Factory Man” without casting the inevitable movie version to come. Picture an updated “Norma Rae” in which the hero isn’t an oppressed factory worker but a desperate factory owner battling scheming relatives, callous Wall Street bankers and ruthless Chinese competitors — all to save his workers’ jobs and his family’s bricks-and-mortar legacy, a furniture business in a speck of a town in south central Virginia. Who would play the black sheep turned white knight, John D. Bassett III? George Clooney or Tom Hanks? How about ­Meryl Streep or Blythe Danner as the family matriarch, Pocahontas Hundley Bassett, a.k.a. Miss Pokey? And what tough-­talking star — Ted Danson, perhaps? — would take on the role of the devious brother-in-law, Bob Spilman, who, by Macy’s account, snatched control of the family business away from the rightful heir, the aforementioned “JBIII”? And what of the book’s villain, Larry Moh, the Chinese übercapitalist seemingly bent on putting American furniture makers out of business? Or the fancy lawyers who wind up making more money than anybody else? “Factory Man” is so thick with rich characters, family secrets and backwoods wisdom that this very abundance becomes its one flaw.

    Another review of Beth Macy’s best seller, Factory Man, at the New York Times.

    It is impossible to read Beth Macy’s “Factory Man” without casting the inevitable movie version to come. Picture an updated “Norma Rae” in which the hero isn’t an oppressed factory worker but a desperate factory owner battling scheming relatives, callous Wall Street bankers and ruthless Chinese competitors — all to save his workers’ jobs and his family’s bricks-and-mortar legacy, a furniture business in a speck of a town in south central Virginia. Who would play the black sheep turned white knight, John D. Bassett III? George Clooney or Tom Hanks? How about ­Meryl Streep or Blythe Danner as the family matriarch, Pocahontas Hundley Bassett, a.k.a. Miss Pokey? And what tough-­talking star — Ted Danson, perhaps? — would take on the role of the devious brother-in-law, Bob Spilman, who, by Macy’s account, snatched control of the family business away from the rightful heir, the aforementioned “JBIII”? And what of the book’s villain, Larry Moh, the Chinese übercapitalist seemingly bent on putting American furniture makers out of business? Or the fancy lawyers who wind up making more money than anybody else? “Factory Man” is so thick with rich characters, family secrets and backwoods wisdom that this very abundance becomes its one flaw.